Richard James Hill

Richard James Hill, Ph.D.

richard.hill@chaminade.edu

Henry 206L
Tel (808) 739-8344
3140 Waialae Ave, Honolulu, HI 96816

Assistant Professor of English (Clinical)

Education

University of Edinburgh (UoE), Edinburgh, UK.
Ph.D. in English Literature, awarded Dec. 2005.
Thesis: “The Illustration of the Waverley Novels in Scotland: Walter Scott’s contribution to the Nineteenth-Century Illustrated Novel.” Joint supervision from the Departments of English Literature and History of Art.

M.Sc. by research in English Literature, awarded October 2002.
J. M. W. Turner’s illustrations for the novels of Sir Walter Scott. Final dissertation: “Re-Viewing History: Re-appraisals of history and the representation of the hero by Walter Scott, J. M. W. Turner and Thomas Carlyle.”

M.A. Honors Degree in English Literature, awarded July 1999.

Teaching

Primary Interests:

British Romantic and Victorian fiction
Scottish fiction
Nineteenth-century historicism
History of the novel
Literature and the visual arts in the long eighteenth century
The novel and popular culture
Colonial literature of the Pacific

Secondary Interests:

Cinematic interpretation of the literary text
History of publishing in nineteenth-century Britain
Nineteenth-century children’s fiction

Publications

Books

Robert Louis Stevenson and the Pictorial Text: A Case Study in the Victorian Illustrated Novel, accepted as a proposal by Ashgate Publishing, contract signed December 2012, for delivery date of August 2015.

Picturing Scotland through the Waverley Novels: Walter Scott and the Origins of the Victorian Illustrated Novel. (Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2010).

Articles

*“Stevenson in the Magazine of Art.” Journal of Stevenson Studies, vol. 9 (Stirling: 2012).

*“Teaching Stevenson’s Pacific Stories to Pacific Classrooms.” Approaches to Teaching Robert Louis Stevenson. Ed. Caroline McCracken-Flesher (New York, NY: Modern Language Association, 2013).

*“Illustrating Island Nights’ Entertainments: the problem of exotic authenticity.” Journal of Stevenson Studies, vol. 8 (Stirling: 2011).

*“Scott, Stevenson and popular visual culture: text and image in romance writing.” National Sun Yat-Sen Journal of Humanities, no. 30 (Kaohsiung: January 2011). Lead article.

*“Robert Louis Stevenson’s Davos studio: author and art in 1882.” Scottish Literary Review, 2, no. 2 (Glasgow: 2011).

*“Scott, Hogg, and the Gift-Book Editors: Authorship in the Face of Industrial Production.” Romantic Textualities: Literature and Print Culture, 1780–1840, 19 (Winter 2009). Online: Internet: .

* “The Illustration of the Waverley Novels: Scott and Popular Illustrated Fiction.” Scottish Literary Review 1, no. 1 (Glasgow: 2009).

Review, “Gillian Hughes, James Hogg: A Life (EUP, 2007).” Romantic Textualities: Literature and Print Culture, 1780-1840, 18 (Summer 2008). Online: Internet. .

*“Writing for Pictures: The Illustrated Gift-Book Contributions of Scott and Hogg.” Studies in Hogg and his World, no. 18 (Stirling: 2007). Lead article.

Co-publisher of the web-site for the Corson Collection’s illustrations associated with the work of Sir Walter Scott, www.walterscott.lib.ed.ac.uk.

“Understanding Walter Scott in the 21st Century.” University of Edinburgh Journal 40, no. 4 (Edinburgh: 2004).

“J. M. W. Turner’s Illustrations to the Work of Sir Walter Scott.” The Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club Bulletin, (Edinburgh: 2003).

“Walter Scott’s Provincial Antiquities and Picturesque Scenery of Scotland.” University of Edinburgh Journal 40, no. 3 (Edinburgh: 2002).

Review, “3 Collections of Poetry,” [Unknown is Best by Edwin Morgan, The Old Man from Brooklyn by Brian Whittingham, and Variations on a New Song by various Scottish poets]. The University of Edinburgh Journal 40, no. 2 (Edinburgh: 2001).

“J. M. W. Turner’s Illustrations to the Work of Sir Walter Scott: Entertainment and Artistic Intent.” The Carlyle Society Papers – Session 2002-2003, Occasional Papers 15 (Edinburgh: 2002).

Review, “Confessions of a Justified Sinner by James Hogg.” The University of Edinburgh Journal, 40, no. 2 (Edinburgh: 2001).